Posts tagged "virginia plain"
Electric Eyes

Electric Eyes

AHE-17 VIRGINIA PLAIN - Electric Eyes b/w Swamp Thing - 7": $5
The Electric Eyes single is the debut recording from the "tech-noir" group, Virginia Plain, fronted by Alfra Martini with support from Fono Luxe members: Justin Miller, Christian Reinhardsen and Robert Boston. The A side, "Electric Eyes", is a classic song sharing musical ties with synth pop pioneers OMD and the 50's crooner vocal stylings of Bryan Ferry.  The song kicks off with Martini's voice gliding over bumping synth bass and 808 drum claps bringing to mind the melancholic pop sound of classic '80's hits like Q Lazzurus' "Goodbye Horses".  Side B’s "Swamp Thing" is the shadowy twin to the bright faced "Electric Eyes".  With it's relentless Sisters of Mercy style beat and minor key synth lines the atmosphere turns from dreamy to sinister.

Regen 1:1

Regen 1:1

(Self-Released) FONO LUXE - Regen 1:1 - CASSETTE: $5
Fono Luxe is the recording project of Virginia Plain members Justin Miller, Christian Reinhardsen, and Robert Boston. Their self-released cassette release is comprised of improvised experiments using a TR-808, Juno 6, Univox Mini Korg, MS-20, Space Echo and a Fender P-Bass. Recorded direct to 1/4" tape.

Virginia Plain

Virginia Plain

Virginia Plain is the new pop project by Alfra Martini, Justin Miller, Christian Reinhardsen, and Robert Boston, a group that incorporates cabaret inspired vocals, cyber punk style synth-scapes and electronic percussion into a classic pop template. Conceived as an outlet for the music Martini began writing after her last project Prudence Teacup went on hiatus, Martini recruited members of the ambient improv group Fono Luxe as collaborators to expand on her newfound sound. Mining similar territory as OMD, The Eurythmics and late period Roxy Music, Virginia Plain creates mood music for slow dances and futuristic night clubs.

Prudence Teacup

Prudence Teacup

Prudence Teacup, aka Alfra Martini, writes lullabies for heroes and sinners. She has been called a “reluctant chanteuse” as she often avoids the stage, preferring the quiet hermitage of a cramped room. Her music weaves antique melodies within electronic soundscapes. There is a genuine playfulness in the way she arranges her songs. The music isn't labored over but rather laid out in a broad expressionistic style. Primitively plucked classical guitars ring out over layers of percussion and midi-instruments. Ghostly sounds envelope her voice, which she expertly layers with splendidly odd harmonies. Fall and redemption, venom and balm, myth and truth all collide in the hiss of her homespun recordings.